Modern Day Vikings

It is almost 1000 years ago that the Vikings roamed the earth. But they are still around. Every year they travel to Scandinavia from all over the world – from Germany, USA, France, Australia, Italy. They participate in Viking markets, drink mead, fight with swords, produce authentic handicrafts and enjoy the life of times long past.
The Viking subculture offers an escape from modern, complex life to a simpler world. For many of the modern Vikings, there is a longing back to times when smart phone xenon flashes did not constantly blink at festive moments. Times when a man was a man and quarrels were settled on the battlefield. They try to find that kind of life in the Viking culture. It might be a dream, an illusion. But at least for the duration of the markets they manage to create their own little world that is quite far away from the stressful everyday life of 2013.

3-year-old Sol stands by her father’s legs during the yearly market in Sagnlandet Lejre.
The vikings are fighting in two lines trying to “kill” the opponents with swords, axes or spears while protecting themselves behind shields. Each line is made up of Viking groups from different places, so that there is an even number of Vikings on each side.
Mathilde stands in the wind during the yearly market in Sagnlandet Lejre.
Some Vikings participate in the evening training during the yearly market in Trelleborg.
Traditional Glima wrestling in Gudvangen, Norway.
Michael takes a swim in the small river that runs near the market area in Trelleborg.
Light from the tents falls on a few skulls in the market area. Sagnlandet Lejre.
The traditional bacon party is underway at Trelleborg inside the longhouse, which is a reconstruction of a Viking building. Every year during the Viking market in Trelleborg a group of Norwegian Vikings cook up a lot of bacon, and the Vikings eat and drink and party.
The traditional bacon party is underway at Trelleborg inside the longhouse, which is a reconstruction of a Viking building. Every year during the Viking market in Trelleborg a group of Norwegian Vikings cook up a lot of bacon, and the Vikings eat and drink and party.
Anders (on the right) takes a group of Vikings out sailing in his boat named Hringhorni. The boat is named after the Norse god Balder’s boat.
Daniel with Viking tattoos made by tattoo artist Lars Martinnen.
Asa and Ravn enjoy a moment of relaxing in their tent in Trelleborg during the yearly market.
A group of French Vikings are out sailing in a boat named Hringhorni. The boat is named after the Norse god Balder’s boat.
Alex and Sarah are out collecting plants that they use for dyeing clothes. Wool and flax are dyed in all kinds of colors depending on the type of plant that is used.